Posts Tagged "discrimination"
  1. video
    Apr 30, 2014 11:37 am

    The Hilarious Acronym All ‘Race-Challenged’ Folks Need To Memorize. (It’s Funny Because It’s True.)

    This is hands down the best advice you’ll ever receive on how to discriminate without discriminating.

  2. photo
    Mar 30, 2014 5:14 pm

    glaad:

    The Maryland House of Delegates passed a bill that would ban discrimination against transgender people. 

  3. video
    Feb 11, 2014 4:02 pm

    She Wants To Be Treated Like Any Other Widow. But One Letter On Her ID Is Making It Impossible.

    In a 2004 ceremony in Orange County, N.Y., Robina Asti, a World War II veteran and pilot, married her longtime sweetheart, Norwood Patton. After Norwood passed away in 2012, Robina applied for survivor’s benefits, and a terrible thing happened. Listen to her story.

  4. photo
    Jan 26, 2014 11:11 am
  5. quote
    Jan 21, 2014 1:43 pm

    "

    As a sociologist, I think it is best to turn to the evidence: Do Asians face discrimination? The labor market is one of the best places to take this question because this is where many people believe Asians have reached parity with white Americans.

    Asian Americans have among the highest earnings in the United States. In 2013, Asians’ median weekly earnings were $973, as compared to $799 for whites, $634 for blacks, and $572 for Latinos. It seems as if Asians do not experience discrimination. However, these aggregate numbers hide many disparities.

    First of all, Asian men earned, on average, 40 percent more than Asian women. The gender gap between Asian men and women is the highest of any racial group. Secondly, these numbers hide the diversity within the Asian community: the 2000 U.S. Census reports Hmong women had an average weekly earnings of just $389 per week – putting them far below average. Whereas Chinese and Indian men earn more on average than white men, the opposite is true for Laotian, Vietnamese, Cambodian, and Hmong men. In sum, some Asians earn more than whites, yet this is the case for only some nationalities – those that have, on average, higher levels of education.

    Chinese and Indian Americans have higher educational attainment than their white male counterparts. This helps explain some of the earnings disparities.

    Studies that take into account educational achievements find that Asian men earn less than their white male counterparts. Sociologists ChangHwan Kim and Arthur Sakamoto found that if you compare white men to Asian men with similar characteristics, the white men often earn more. In other words, if an Asian American man and a white man both live in New York, both went to selective universities, and both studied engineering, we could expect that the Asian American man would earn, on average, 8 percent less than the white man.

    The fact that Asian Americans do not earn as much as white men with the same qualifications points to the fact that Asian Americans face labor market discrimination. In other words, there is a real monetary cost to being Asian American. Over the course of one’s career, this disparity can amount to significant amounts of money.

    Labor market discrimination against Asians is not unique to the United States. A study conducted in Australia also uncovered labor market discrimination against Asians. Alison Booth and her colleagues conducted an audit study where they sent 4,000 fictitious job applications out for entry-level jobs, where they varied only the last name of the applicant – thereby signaling ethnicity.

    The results were that the average callback rate for Anglo-Saxons was 35 percent. Applications with an Italian-sounding name received responses 32 percent of the time – with only a small statistically significant difference. The differences were starker for the other groups: indigenous applicants obtained an interview 26 percent of the time, Chinese applicants 21 percent of the time, and Middle Easterners 22 percent of the time. According to these findings, Anglo-Saxons would have to submit three job applications to have a decent shot at getting a callback whereas Chinese applicants can expect to submit five.

    "

    "Hashtag Sparks Discussion About Asian American Discrimination", Racism Review, 12/17/13

    Besides the debunking of the “Asians don’t face discrimination in hiring, they show that Americans don’t see race and hire only by qualification” myth, note the massive wage gap between Asian men and women.

    (via ami-angelwings)

    dear every white dude who has told me that “Asians have more power than white people” -

    (via mohala-sumiko)

  6. link
    Dec 25, 2013 5:48 pm

    An Effect Of Discrimination You Might Have Suspected But Have Never Seen Proven. Until Now.

  7. quote
    Dec 16, 2013 9:23 pm

    "Vote against discrimination…Do not do them because they are economically sound — although they are — do them because they are right and just. Never allow the majority to limit the rights of the minority. Never allow people who fear anyone different from themselves to limit other’s human rights or human dignity."

    Tim Cook, the openly gay CEO of Apple who tends to keep quiet about his personal life, spoke about discrimination and equality at the United Nations last week while accepting a Lifetime Achievement Award from Auburn University. (via Out)
  8. photo
    Dec 07, 2013 6:16 pm

    sinidentidades:

    Texas principal bans Latin@ students from speaking Spanish to ‘prevent disruptions’

    Hempstead Independent School District (ISD) in Texas has confirmed that a middle school principal has been placed on leave after Latin@ students said that she forbade the entire school from speaking Spanish.

    A group of students told KHOU that Hempstead Middle School Principal Amy Lacey announced over the intercom on Nov. 12 that they were no longer to use their native language in order to “prevent disruptions.”

    It was over two weeks later before the superintendent sent a letter home insisting that “neither the district or any campus has any policy prohibiting the speaking of Spanish.”

    But the students said that the effect of the ban had been chilling.

    “People don’t want to speak it no more, and they don’t want to get caught speaking it because they’re going to get in trouble,” sixth-grade student Kiara Lozano explained to KHOU.

    Some students felt that the principal gave teachers permission to discriminate against them.

    “She was like no speaking Spanish,” eighth-grader Yedhany Gallegos recalled. “I was like that’s my first language. She said, well you can get out.”

    Hempstead ISD spokesperson Laurie Bettis said in a statement that Lacey had been placed on leave while the district investigated the charges.

    “The district has received allegations regarding this issue and the district is investigating the matter,” Bettis wrote. “At this time, the administrator is on administrative leave with pay until the investigation is completed and appropriate action is determined. This is all we can say at this time as there is a pending investigation on this matter.”

    “The district is committed to efficiently and effectively resolving this matter with as little disruption to our students and their learning environment as possible.”

    Read more

  9. link
    Sep 04, 2013 2:44 pm

    When Doctors Discriminate

    avioletmind:

    THE first time it was an ear, nose and throat doctor. I had an emergency visit for an ear infection, which was causing a level of pain I hadn’t experienced since giving birth. He looked at the list of drugs I was taking for my bipolar disorder and closed my chart.

    “I don’t feel comfortable prescribing anything,” he said. “Not with everything else you’re on.” He said it was probably safe to take Tylenol and politely but firmly indicated it was time for me to go. The next day my eardrum ruptured and I was left with minor but permanent hearing loss.

    Another time I was lying on the examining table when a gastroenterologist I was seeing for the first time looked at my list of drugs and shook her finger in my face. “You better get yourself together psychologically,” she said, “or your stomach is never going to get any better.”

    If you met me, you’d never know I was mentally ill. In fact, I’ve gone through most of my adult life without anyone ever knowing — except when I’ve had to reveal it to a doctor. And that revelation changes everything. It wipes clean the rest of my résumé, my education, my accomplishments, reduces me to a diagnosis.

    I was surprised when, after one of these run-ins, my psychopharmacologist said this sort of behavior was all too common. At least 14 studies have shown that patients with a serious mental illness receive worse medical care than “normal” people. Last year the World Health Organization called the stigma and discrimination endured by people with mental health conditions “a hidden human rights emergency.”

    I never knew it until I started poking around, but this particular kind of discriminatory doctoring has a name. It’s called “diagnostic overshadowing.”

    According to a review of studies done by the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College, London, it happens a lot. As a result, people with a serious mental illness — including bipolar disorder, major depression, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder — end up with wrong diagnoses and are under-treated.

    That is a problem, because if you are given one of these diagnoses you probably also suffer from one or more chronic physical conditions: though no one quite knows why, migraines, irritable bowel syndrome and mitral valve prolapse often go hand in hand with bipolar disorder.

    Less mysterious is the weight gain associated with most of the drugs used to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, which can easily snowball into diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. The drugs can also sedate you into a state of zombiedom, which can make going to the gym — or even getting off your couch — virtually impossible.

    It’s little wonder that many people with a serious mental illness don’t seek medical attention when they need it. As a result, many of us end up in emergency rooms — where doctors, confronted with an endless stream of drug addicts who come to their door looking for an easy fix — are often all too willing to equate mental illness with drug-seeking behavior and refuse to prescribe pain medication.

    I should know: a few years ago I had a persistent migraine, and after weeks trying to get an appointment with any of the handful of headache specialists in New York City, I broke down and went to the E.R. My husband filled out paperwork and gave the nurse my list of drugs. The doctors finally agreed to give me something stronger than what my psychopharmacologist could prescribe for the pain and hooked me up to an IV.

    I lay there for hours wearing sunglasses to block out the fluorescent light, waiting for the pain relievers to kick in. But the headache continued. “They gave you saline and electrolytes,” my psychopharmacologist said later. “Welcome to being bipolar.”

    When I finally saw the specialist two weeks later (during which time my symptoms included numbness and muscle weakness), she accused me of being “a serious cocaine user” (I don’t touch the stuff) and of displaying symptoms of “la belle indifference,” a 19th-century term for a kind of hysteria in which the patient converts emotional symptoms into physical ones — i.e., it was all in my head.

    Indeed, given my experience over the last two decades, I shouldn’t have been surprised by the statistics I found in the exhaustive report “Morbidity and Mortality in People with Serious Mental Illness,” a review of studies published in 2006 that provides an overview of recommendations and general call to arms by the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors. The take-away: people who suffer from a serious mental illness and use the public health care system die 25 years earlier than those without one.

    True, suicide is a big factor, accounting for 30 to 40 percent of early deaths. But 60 percent die of preventable or treatable conditions. First on the list is, unsurprisingly, cardiovascular disease. Two studies showed that patients with both a mental illness and a cardiovascular condition received about half the number of follow-up interventions, like bypass surgery or cardiac catheterization, after having a heart attack than did the “normal” cardiac patients.

    The report also contains a list of policy recommendations, including designating patients with serious mental illnesses as a high-priority population; coordinating and integrating mental and physical health care for such people; education for health care workers and patients; and a quality-improvement process that supports increased access to physical health care and ensures appropriate prevention, screening and treatment services.

    Such changes, if implemented, might make a real difference. And after seven years of no change, signs of movement are popping up, particularly among academic programs aimed at increasing awareness of mental health issues. Several major medical schools now have programs in the medical humanities, an emerging field that draws on diverse disciplines including the visual arts, humanities, music and science to make medical students think differently about their patients. And Johns Hopkins offers a doctor of public health with a specialization in mental health.

    Perhaps the most notable of these efforts — and so far the only one of its kind — is the narrative medicine program at Columbia University Medical Center, which starts with the premise that there is a disconnect between health care and patients and that health care workers need to start listening to what their patients are telling them, and not just looking at what’s written on their charts.

    According to the program’s mission statement, “The effective practice of health care requires the ability to recognize, absorb, interpret, and act on the stories and plights of others. Medicine practiced with narrative competence is a model for humane and effective medical practice.”

    We can only hope that humanizing programs like this one become a requirement for all health care workers. Maybe then “first, do no harm” will apply to everyone, even the mentally ill.

    The author of the novel “Too Bright to Hear Too Loud to See” and a co-editor of “Voices of Bipolar Disorder: The Healing Companion.”

  10. photo
    Aug 24, 2013 8:07 pm

    thetrevorproject:

    itgetsbetterproject:

    We’re very proud to present our first collaboration with the amazing people at the TSER (transstudent.tumblr.com). 

    A BIG thank you to Eli, Landyn, Alex and Ethan for this awesome work.

    Knowledge is power. Learn more about your rights as a student - visit transstudent.org. You can also get more information from the ACLU’s “Know Your Rights: A Guide for Trans and Gender Nonconforming Students” (http://www.aclu.org/files/assets/transstudent_kyr_20120508.pdf)

    Check out the TSER on Facebook (facebook.com/transstudent) and Twitter (twitter.com/transstudent)

    Great information. Thanks for putting this together!

    If you’re trans*, gender nonconforming, questioning, or an ally, check out this resource.

    If you’re having a hard time and need to talk, call the Trevor Lifeline: 866-488-7386.

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